3 Misguided Mistakes Most People Make When Aiming for a Promotion

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Everybody loves a promotion, so much that many will go to great lengths to achieve it. However, they can end up losing that possible rise in the ranks despite their efforts. If you’re truly set on earning a promotion, then avoid the following habits and deeds.

Sitting On Your Laurels – You do deserve credit for every one of your completed projects and excellent performances at work. However, reminding others constantly of what you’ve done, the awards you got, and even your skills when it’s not even necessary are uncalled for. Besides, focusing on the past can reduce your drive to achieve more in the future and that attitude can be counterproductive to your objectives.

Seeing Others as Competition – Yes, the company can choose other employees for that promotion. However, constantly thinking of your co-workers as competition can hamper the team spirit of your division. Cooperation and unity is an essential part of any organization and putting that aside in exchange for a possible raise can cause disastrous results. In the end, that kind of attitude can even get in the way of your climb to the top.

Focusing on Just Work – Hard work can eventually earn you the attention, but investing your effort in overtime can also be done by your fellow workmates. Enroll in a course that’s connected to your work instead. Join in-house seminars and training sessions. Sign up for workshops and conventions outside the company. Aim for certifications by reputable accreditation agencies such as CompTIA A+ and take a practice test when necessary. Remember that learning and self-improvement is a continuous goal, whether you’re targeting for a promotion or not.

Simply put, rising in your career may be your ultimate goal, but it should not get in the way of positive attitudes, self-improvement, and teamwork since these are what most higher-ups are looking for in their constituents. Work hard, but don’t just do it for the raise. Do it for yourself and for the company you serve; you’ll eventually be noticed by those who matter.

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