Unique ContentAny SEO expert in Australia knows unique content is money, but the exact uniqueness of text-based web pieces still tend to render even an experienced digital marketer clueless. The term “unique” is vague and misleading, leaving you confused of its actual meaning.

Does borrowing a famous line or using overused idioms improve your content quality or hurt your page’s ranking? Are you doomed to constructing sentences not a single soul has thought of first to rank high?

It’s absolutely tricky at first. Fortunately, though, Google isn’t sticking to its strict, literal sense.

What Should Be Unique Is…

The value users can get from content. The search giant itself believes that producing a 100% original piece is impossible; anything can influence or inspire another thing. Seeing a similar line from at least two pages is unavoidable; what Google wants is for every piece to bring fresh value to users. This train of thought is the reason the leading search engine punishes sites with thin content—pieces that add little or no value to anyone.

As DMB.com.au says, your content should have something new. Offer at least one distinct benefit to the readers compared with the pieces the writer used as reference. Experts in Perth search engine optimisation are particularly adept at this—they use techniques such as using transcription texts for videos and complementing products with reviews.

Duplicate Is Not Spam

While both terms can refer to unoriginality, duplicate content is not necessarily spammy. Google’s Matt Cutts himself clarified that duplicate lines of text won’t hurt, unless the text aims to manipulate the search engine rankings. In short, you may use clichés, but never copy and paste.

To clearly understand the context of unique content is to breathe a sigh of relief. Now that you got your confusion out of the way, leverage high-quality pieces to rank your page first on Google.