Need-to-Know Facts about HVAC Systems for Every Homeowner

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HVAC FactsWhile other people just dismiss the air-conditioning system they use at home as just another appliance, smart homeowners pay more attention. For sure, you can be satisfied that you know how to set the thermostat and that you have the number of an HVAC expert in Salt Lake City. However, you would get more from your AC system if you bother to know more about how it works.

The truth about air conditioner filters

So what do you know about AC filters? The usual advice is to change them regularly, especially if people with compromised health live in the house. You should remember to change the filter as well if there are pets living in your home.

It no secret how important it is for air conditioning systems to have properly functioning filters. While the popular notion is changing the filter once a year, experts actually have a different take on the matter. To clarify, filters should be changed every three months, minimum. If you refer to the Energy Star Program of the Environmental Protection Agency, you will see that the ideal frequency is once a month.

When there is too much leakage of water

Air conditioning units produce condensation due to the combustion processes occurring within. The drain tube takes the condensate outside of the appliance’s interior. A regular pool of water indicates either a pipe leak or a blockage somewhere along the way. In some instances, the blockage is formed algae growth. The third potential cause is an overflow due to a poorly functioning condensate pump. To address the pool of water, the exact cause must first be identified. This is where professional HVAC personnel come in. Make that call immediately, and restore optimal AC function before bigger problems develop.

By learning about basic air-conditioning functions and potential issues, you can get the best performance out of it. If you know how the system works, you can make the timely and correct decisions if something suddenly goes wrong.

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